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My East Is Your West

My East is Your West, a Collateral Event of the 56th International Art Exhibition – la Biennale di Venezia, opens today, Tuesday 5th May 2015. Commissioned by The Gujral Foundation, this landmark exhibition unites for the first time at the Biennale the historically conflicting nations of India and Pakistan in a shared exhibition by artists from both countries. Shilpa Gupta (Mumbai) and Rashid Rana (Lahore) each present a new series of works at the Palazzo Benzon, situated in the centre of Venice on the Grand Canal. As neither India nor Pakistan has a permanent national pavilion in Venice, this presentation provides a unique platform for artists from South Asia to enter into a dialogue through the arts, representing the Indian subcontinent as one region.Titled after a light installation by Shilpa Gupta, My East is Your West was born out of the desire to reposition the complex climate of historical relations between South Asia’s nation-states and presents the region as a shared cultural cartography. Shilpa Gupta’s new series of works brings together over four years of ongoing research in the India-Bangladesh borderlands and the world’s longest security barrier between two nation-states currently in construction. She exhibits works ranging from installation, video, photography, drawings, text-based pieces and performance, which will take place throughout the opening week and at intervals throughout the Biennale. Rashid Rana presents an immersive setting across five rooms surveying the conception of presence, temporality and location as collective experience, across digital printmaking, video and installation. In a livestream video work, produced in collaboration with the Lahore Biennale Foundation, viewers will be transported from Venice to Lahore and viceversa.Reflecting each distinctive practice, both artists explore and examine the integral essence of a people divided, a history which spans antiquity, colonial modernity and a cosmopolitan present entangled inconflict. With works that bring to the foreground entangled realities of the Indian subcontinent, Shilpa Gupta and Rashid Rana develop a material aesthetic that surveys the potential of a common region, separate from the state and its model.Shilpa Gupta and Rashid Rana and Naeem Mohaiemen, also exhibiting at the Venice Biennale, will participate in an artist talk, Imagined Cartographies, focusing on their practice and contemporary art in South Asia. The talk will take place at the Palazzo Benzon on Thursday 7th May from 11:00am – 12:30pm and will be moderated by Curatorial Advisors for the project, Natasha Ginwala and Martina Mazzotta.

Artist:

Shilpa Gupta, Rashid Rana

Venue

Venice, Italy

State of Indigo

By | Current Shows
Venue:

Somerset House
London

India will immerse viewers in one of the troughs used in indigo production, a dye used to make jeans and other textiles, whose methods have gone largely unchanged for millennia.

Presenting films of the workers, who stand in a line thrashing the water with their outstretched legs, the installation will exploit the hours of hard labour produce only a small bar of concentrated dye, known as ‘blue gold’.

The story of indigo is closely aligned with India’s design identity. As a natural form of dye, it is a reminder of traditional methods of cultivating and processing textiles that were pioneered in the subcontinent. In terms of its status as a colour that is inseparable from luxury and desire on the one hand, and exploitation on the other, it is a highly ideologically loaded design tool, which needs to be asserted as being representative of India’s design identity.

Studio 24

By | Explore
Venue:

24 Jor Bagh
New Delhi

STUDIO 24, an experimental micro-residency at 24 Jor Bagh, kicks off the first iteration with emerging artist Raj Jariwala, in association with Shrine Empire Gallery. Join us for the open studio on 19-20 July, 3 – 7pm to step into Raj’s practice exploring processes of producing and consuming information. The artist looks closely at the accuracy, relevance, and abstraction of structures such as cartography and numerical systems through drawing and vide

My East Is Your West

By | Uncategorized
Artist:

Shilpa Gupta, Rashid Rana

Venue:

Venice
Italy

My East is Your West, a Collateral Event of the 56th International Art Exhibition – la Biennale di Venezia, opens today, Tuesday 5th May 2015. Commissioned by The Gujral Foundation, this landmark exhibition unites for the first time at the Biennale the historically conflicting nations of India and Pakistan in a shared exhibition by artists from both countries. Shilpa Gupta (Mumbai) and Rashid Rana (Lahore) each present a new series of works at the Palazzo Benzon, situated in the centre of Venice on the Grand Canal. As neither India nor Pakistan has a permanent national pavilion in Venice, this presentation provides a unique platform for artists from South Asia to enter into a dialogue through the arts, representing the Indian subcontinent as one region.

Titled after a light installation by Shilpa Gupta, My East is Your West was born out of the desire to reposition the complex climate of historical relations between South Asia’s nation-states and presents the region as a shared cultural cartography. Shilpa Gupta’s new series of works brings together over four years of ongoing research in the India-Bangladesh borderlands and the world’s longest security barrier between two nation-states currently in construction. She exhibits works ranging from installation, video, photography, drawings, text-based pieces and performance, which will take place throughout the opening week and at intervals throughout the Biennale. Rashid Rana presents an immersive setting across five rooms surveying the conception of presence, temporality and location as collective experience, across digital printmaking, video and installation. In a livestream video work, produced in collaboration with the Lahore Biennale Foundation, viewers will be transported from Venice to Lahore and viceversa.

Reflecting each distinctive practice, both artists explore and examine the integral essence of a people divided, a history which spans antiquity, colonial modernity and a cosmopolitan present entangled inconflict. With works that bring to the foreground entangled realities of the Indian subcontinent, Shilpa Gupta and Rashid Rana develop a material aesthetic that surveys the potential of a common region, separate from the state and its model.

Shilpa Gupta and Rashid Rana and Naeem Mohaiemen, also exhibiting at the Venice Biennale, will participate in an artist talk, Imagined Cartographies, focusing on their practice and contemporary art in South Asia. The talk will take place at the Palazzo Benzon on Thursday 7th May from 11:00am – 12:30pm and will be moderated by Curatorial Advisors for the project, Natasha Ginwala and Martina Mazzotta.

Imagined Biennales

By | Current Shows
Venue:

Open Forum at Tate Exchange
London

Imagined Biennales – Open Forum at Tate Exchange

13 May 2018
Tate Modern

The proliferation of biennales and other perennial art events around the world reveal huge energy, creativity and social engagement within the sphere of contemporary art. Whether operating at hyper-local, local, national or international levels, these events are always more than the art they represent. They are about people, places, histories, social enterprise and the political aesthetic. But equally, they can be homogenizing forces and complacent about the ‘value’ of art. What do we want from our biennales and how do we get it?

Imagined Communities invites as wide a range of voices as possible to share in current practice and to pitch new ideas. What does a biennale look like and what do want it to look like? Echoing the format of TED talks, noted for short, but well-informed talks, we welcome presentations in person, short films or online streamed presentations as part of an afternoon at Tate Exchange. The best ideas and presentations will be invited for inclusion in a forthcoming publication How to Biennale: A manual for staging perennial art events.

Hello World

By | Current Shows
Venue:

Museum für Gegenwart
Berlin

Hello World. Revising a Collection

28.04.2018 to 26.08.2018
Hamburger Bahnhof – Museum für Gegenwart – Berlin

Hello World. Revising a Collection“ is a critical inquiry into the collection of the Nationalgalerie and its predominantly Western focus: What could the collection look like today, had an understanding characterised its concept of art, and consequently also its genesis, that was more open to the world? How might the canon and the art historical narratives themselves have changed through a widening and multiplication of perspectives? With these questions as starting points, the exhibition unfolds in 13 thematic chapters as a many-voiced collaboration of internal and external curators, encompassing the whole exhibition space of the Hamburger Bahnhof – Museum für Gegenwart – Berlin.

Arrival, Incision Indian Modernism as Peripatetic Itinerary

Curated by Natasha Ginwala

This exhibition chapter retraces the emergence of Indian modernity in the early and mid-twentieth century, through placing works from the collection of the National – galerie and the Museum für Asiatische Kunst centre stage. As India obtained its independence from British Rule in 1947 and in the wake of partition, many artists shuttled between the newly independent subcontinent, Europe and North America. As did the painter, poet and intellectual Rabindranath Tagore. The works Tagore contributed to the collection of the Nationalgalerie were removed by the Nazis as part of their “degenerate art” policy, but an attempt is made here to reconstruct this episode to some extent on the basis of the influence Tagore exerted on the Berlin art scene in the 1920s and early 1930s. Arrival, Incision offers exercises in decanonising the Western art-historical tradition and deals with reciprocity, both real and imagined, by juxtaposing the political caricatures of George Grosz with those of Gaganendranath Tagore and through charting a nonlinear itinerary of works by artists from the 1950s to the present day, including Avinash Chandra, Satish Gujral, Somnath Hore and Anish Kapoor. The recurrence of specific narratives are revealed as key characteristics of Indian art, including the spiritual and cosmic lexicon of tantra, use of vernacular techniques and modes of collective production. Alongside artistic works and rare documentation, cinema operates as a window into artistic biographies and India’s asynchronous industrial modernity.

Regimes Of Truth

By | Explore
Venue:

Gati Dance Forum
New Delhi

REGIMES OF TRUTH | An In-Progress Viewing

24 – 29 April
Gati Dance Forum. New Delhi

Featuring: Arko Datto | Asim Waqif | Mandeep Raikhy | Payal Arya | Samar Grewal | Sandip Kuriakose

Curated by: Shaunak Mahbubani

We are witnessing an attempt to spread new historical, communal, and emotional narratives with a speed and perseverance unseen in the post-independence era. The promoters of this populist ideology have managed to bring minds into their hold across class and geography through a combination of on-ground community vigilance, tight control over news-media, and clever use of digital media strategies.

Foucault’s notion of Knowledge-Power gives us a framework to critically examine the fabrication of these new ‘regimes of truth’. We trace his idea that power is not solely a destructive force, but also a ‘producer of reality’. Control over knowledge, through surveillance and censorship as we see today, allows the state to build and propagate narratives that will consolidate its political power for the next electoral cycle. The exhibition is a means to document this phenomenon as it occurs around us, while simultaneously trying to understand it and its implications further.

This exploratory ‘in-progress’ viewing will present a subset of the final exhibition, featuring Arko Datto’s photographs of commonplace surveillance, Mandeep Raikhy’s diffused movement piece performed to Samar Grewal’s charged composition, Asim Waqif’s commentary on news media, Sandip Kuriakose’s document as a testimony to discrimination, and Payal Arya’s landscape of hazed diversions.

The final exhibition concept, part two of the ongoing series ‘Allies for the Uncertain Futures’ curated by Shaunak Mahbubani, has been chosen for an Apexart international exhibition grant, and will be exhibited in late 2018.

And Sometimes, She Loved Me Too

By | Explore
Artist:

Karan Talwar

Venue:

24 Jor Bagh, New Delhi

‘And Sometimes, She Loved Me Too’

A film and exhibit by Karan Talwar
The exhibit and film owes it’s inspiration to the Museum of Ordinary Objects

‘And Sometimes, She Loved Me Too’ is an ode to objects and how we remember. Using a film and an exhibit around it, the experience attempts to draw in the viewer in the world of ordinary objects.

Objects are memory portals; into worlds deeply personal and profoundly universal. In their quiet, unassuming, unexpected ways, objects speak of us; and our times. They carry marks of their lives with us. A crack, a stain, an energy; that can be seen, smelt, touched and felt.

We move in time through objects, remembering and forgetting. They bring forth associations we have long left behind and bring us closer to new feelings, all with their unsaid and non-judgmental grace.

Queensize

By | Explore
Artist:

Gati Dance

Location:

Jor Bagh, Lodhi road
New Delhi

Queen-size is a choreographic exploration that takes the form of a detailed study of the intimacy between two men. Played out on a charpoy, the duet examines the nuts and bolts – carnal, mechanical and emotional – of a close encounter between two male bodies. In deliberately making this encounter visible, Queen-size poses questions around spectatorship, privacy and dissent.

The work has been triggered by and is an artistic response to Nishit Saran’s article titled ‘Why My Bedroom Habits Are Your Business’, first published in the Indian Express in January 2000.
1. Choreographer: Mandeep Raikhy
2. Performers and Collaborators: Lalit Khatana & Parinay Mehra
3. Sound Designer: Yasuhiro Morinaga
4. Light Designer: Jonathan O’Hear
5. Photographer: Desmond Roberts
6. The production of the work has been supported by Pro Helvetia- Swiss Arts Council, Japan
7. Foundation, Nishit Saran Foundation & Gujral Foundation.
10.Vishal K Dar (architect & visual artist)